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2/26/2019 6:39:00 PM
Purdue blocking Netflix, Hulu, gaming sites in all classrooms after spring break
Purdue blocked popular streaming services in classrooms in Forney Hall of Chemical Engineering as a test this semester, while setting up spaces for a new
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Purdue blocked popular streaming services in classrooms in Forney Hall of Chemical Engineering as a test this semester, while setting up spaces for a new "Purdue Recreational Link" service on the university's broadband network for students, staff and faculty. Purdue will make that model standard practice for all classrooms and academic buildings on the West Lafayette campus, starting after spring break in March. Photo by Dave Bangert

Dave Bangert, Journal and Courier Columnist

WEST LAFAYETTE – The days scrolling through Netflix and queuing up a movie in a lecture hall are coming to an end at Purdue University.

A pair of experiments during the fall and spring semesters – both of which blocked the most popular streaming sites from Purdue’s broadband connections in Purdue’s biggest lecture halls – worked so well that filtering out streaming video and gaming platforms will be the new standard for all classrooms across the West Lafayette campus.

By the time students return from spring break, on March 18, access in classrooms will be blocked for bandwidth-eating movie and TV services Netflix and Hulu, the Steam gaming site, music services iTunes, Pandora and iHeartRadio, and Apple updates. Special areas in all academic buildings will be set up to access those sites.

Julie Kercher-Updike, Purdue’s deputy chief information officer, said a university surveyed other schools and believe it’s the first in the Big Ten to go this way.

“This is aimed at what’s considered recreational streaming,” said Julie Kercher-Updike, Purdue’s deputy chief information officer. “It’s really about making it so streaming doesn’t take away from giving academic resources first priority.”

The move has been a year in the making, starting with a plea from Purdue President Mitch Daniels.

In February 2018, Daniels went to faculty leaders on the University Senate, asking professors for help in getting a handle on Purdue’s broadband service, which had doubled in price and seen five times the consumption in four years. Daniels said he wasn’t concerned, as much, about use of Purdue Air Link – known as PAL, the university’s wireless service for students, staff and faculty – in residence halls or other places they live and congregate on campus when out of class.

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