Ann Calvert, center, laughs as she gets her e-scooter to work while Jerad Shockley, left, and Baker Calvert, 14, right, have to push theirs up the large hill at Dress Plaza in Evansville on Friday, July 3, 2020.
Ann Calvert, center, laughs as she gets her e-scooter to work while Jerad Shockley, left, and Baker Calvert, 14, right, have to push theirs up the large hill at Dress Plaza in Evansville on Friday, July 3, 2020.
EVANSVILLE – The e-scooter business is growing in Evansville, according to entrepreneurs who brought them here last year, although use on the Pigeon Creek Greenway Passage is still prohibited.

Rebecca Weaver and her partner, Steve Dean, have more than 100 e-scooters docked across the city, which can be found and rented on a smartphone app called Evil Corn Dogs.

“Daily I get told, this is what the city and the citizens needed,” said Weaver, who recently opened an office and shop on East Louisiana Street. “It's always some sort of thank you.”

Most docking stations are in the Downtown area of Evansville, and in many cases this summer, riders are taking them on the greenway path facing the riverfront.

A city regulation however, forbids e-scooters on the greenway. The City Council passed the rule in December, during its last meeting of 2019. The vote was 5-4.

Then and now, Weaver said she disagrees with the rule. City officials should encourage use of the greenway, she said, and she can’t personally dictate where e-scooter users choose to ride.

Weaver stressed she wants to work with the city, though. She said she removed a cluster of parked e-scooters from behind the Evansville Museum, a few feet off the greenway, at city officials’ request. That happened last week.

"Almost all of our whole customer base goes right downtown to the riverfront,” Weaver said. “All I'm doing is meeting a demand. The riverfront is more popular than it ever has been, and that's what the city and citizens want.”

No motorized vehicles are allowed for recreational use on the greenway, said Brian Holtz, city Parks and Recreation director. It was Holtz who contacted Weaver and asked that the station behind the museum be removed. Weaver said she immediately did so.

Evansville Police are not citing people for riding e-scooters on the greenway, but officers have given some warnings, said Sgt. Nick Winsett, a police spokesman.

The greenway issue aside, however, Weaver and Dean said they couldn’t be happier with how much their enterprise has grown in a short time.

They have had contracts for e-scooter usage with local employment agencies, who often assist people with transportation needs.
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