Spin, an electric scooter-share company owned by Ford, is planning to launch in Bloomington. Bird, Lime, Spin and any other scooter-share companies that come to town may soon have to operated under a new set of rules. (Courtesy photo)

Spin, an electric scooter-share company owned by Ford, is planning to launch in Bloomington. Bird, Lime, Spin and any other scooter-share companies that come to town may soon have to operated under a new set of rules. (Courtesy photo)

Scooter-share companies such as Bird, Lime and newcomer Spin may soon operate under a tighter, more permanent set of city rules.

Last September, Bird Rides and Lime dropped more than 550 scooters around Bloomington without warning. After two months, the city decided to regulate scooters using the same rules that govern bicyclists. Bird and Lime then signed temporary contracts with the city in November to establish additional rules and a fee system that charges companies $10,000 per year, plus 10 cents each time someone rides a scooter.

Spin, a scooter-share company owned by Ford, could be the last company to launch in Bloomington under those temporary restrictions.

“We learned what it was like to not have a rule-set, then we learned what it was like to have a rule-set with the operating agreement. Now, we’re learning there are more things to learn,” said Alex Crowley, director of the city’s Economic and Sustainable Development Department.

The Bloomington City Council will read a proposed scooter ordinance into the record during Wednesday’s city council meeting, which begins at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 401 N. Morton St. A full discussion will take place at the city council’s April 10 and 17 meetings. If approved, the scooter ordinance would go into effect on July 1.

Registration

Under the proposed ordinance, the city’s Board of Public Works would have the power to review and issue licenses to shared-use scooter companies. After one year, the board would evaluate each company’s license based on how well it has followed the rules. Part of that licensing process will also allow the board to set a limit on how many scooters each company can deploy. That limit could change each time the license is up for renewal, or with the seasons.

-30 -

© 2019 HeraldTimesOnline, Bloomington, IN