The $140 million Purdue Engineering and Polytechnic Gateway Complex is expected to be finished in 2022. (Photo: Purdue University)
The $140 million Purdue Engineering and Polytechnic Gateway Complex is expected to be finished in 2022. (Photo: Purdue University)
WEST LAFAYETTE – Purdue picked up a $40 million commitment from the Lilly Endowment on Tuesday to help build a facility the university has touted as a new gateway to campus meant to beef up space for its engineering and polytechnic degree programs.

Lilly Endowment will put up $40 million toward the $140 million Purdue Engineering and Polytechnic Gateway Complex, Clay Robbins, the Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment’s chairman, president and CEO, told a crowd Tuesday on campus.

The complex, already backed by $60 million from the Indiana General Assembly, will be two buildings where Purdue’s Nuclear Engineering Building and Michael Golden Engineering Labs are now. The new complex will include 255,000 square feet – double the space in the two existing buildings – shared by the two colleges.

The facility, when opened in 2022, will have project-based labs and design studios. Among them will be something Purdue is calling the Hoosier Hot Corner, touted as a front door for Indiana companies looking to tap into Purdue researchers and to find students for internships and jobs.

Purdue President Mitch Daniels told the crowd that the Engineering and Polytechnic Gateway Complex was key to the university’s attempt to find more space for students looking to come to Purdue to study science, technology, engineering and math. According to enrollment numbers released this week, Purdue has nearly 22,000 students – or 65 percent of its undergraduates – pursuing STEM-related degrees.

Daniels said the goal is to build on those figures.
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