Rebecca Aleman, left, and Olivia Leos, right, graduate assistants for Crimson Cupboard at Indiana University, restock shelves Friday at their Campus View location. (Rich Janzaruk / Herald-Times)
Rebecca Aleman, left, and Olivia Leos, right, graduate assistants for Crimson Cupboard at Indiana University, restock shelves Friday at their Campus View location. (Rich Janzaruk / Herald-Times)
Nearly 25% of IU students could face food insecurity this semester.

That figure comes from an IU Dining presentation during an Indiana University Board of Trustees meeting in August.

By the time the meeting had ended, Molly Connor, chair of the board’s Student Relations Committee, said she had already received more than two dozen emails from people asking how they could help address food insecurity on campus.

“I have sort of known that the issue of collegiate food insecurity has been really pervasive for a while, but I think the pandemic has really exacerbated a lot of those issues that already existed,” Connor said.

The U.S Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. Consistent access to adequate food can be difficult for some college students to afford, and the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has only made things worse. The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this summer the unemployment rate among 20 to 24-year-olds went from 9% to 26%.
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