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home : most recent : region 2 September 25, 2017


8/20/2017 4:20:00 PM
Monument to Confederates remains in Lafayette's Greenbush Cemetery
A monument honoring both Union and Confederate soldiers from the Civil War buried in Greenbush Cemetery Friday, August 18, 2017, in Lafayette. Staff photo by John Terhune/Journal & Courier
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A monument honoring both Union and Confederate soldiers from the Civil War buried in Greenbush Cemetery Friday, August 18, 2017, in Lafayette. Staff photo by John Terhune/Journal & Courier
Markers for Confederate soldiers from the Civil War buried in Greenbush Cemetery Friday, August 18, 2017, in Lafayette. The soldiers died as prisoners of war in Lafayette during the Civil War. Staff photo: John Terhune/Journal & Courier
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Markers for Confederate soldiers from the Civil War buried in Greenbush Cemetery Friday, August 18, 2017, in Lafayette. The soldiers died as prisoners of war in Lafayette during the Civil War. Staff photo: John Terhune/Journal & Courier

Dave Bangert, Journal and Courier Columnist

LAFAYETTE – On a Saturday afternoon in May, a small group representing the lone Indiana chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy stood in a downpour near the back corner of Greenbush Cemetery, along a line of 28 headstones marked, “Unknown CSA.”

At the base of another stone, this one a slab nine feet tall and installed in 1998, the members of the Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest Chapter out of Cicero, planted two, shin-high markers. Pam Schmidt, a Daughters of the Confederacy member from Fort Wayne who helped arrange the ceremony, said the chapter tries to hold Southern Cross of Honor ceremonies – dedicating black, iron crosses ringed by the initials for Confederate States of America and centered by a depiction of a Confederate battle flag – once a year.

They learned about the Lafayette monument to Civil War soldiers – Confederate POWs who died in Lafayette in 1862 and 22 Union soldiers killed in a horrific train collision in southern Tippecanoe County in 1864 – from “Beneath These Stones: The Story of the Confederate Prisoners in Lafayette,” a book author Mary Blair Immel wrote in 1998.

There were prayers, a recitation of the names of the Confederate soldiers buried in a cemetery containing many of Lafayette’s oldest settlers and sprinkling of dirt from Tennessee, where the 38 men had been captured and brought to a prison camp in Lafayette in 1862.

“A very reverent ceremony,” Schmidt called it.

Related Links:
• Journal & Courier full text

Related Stories:
• Montgomery County has Confederate connection with 64 soldiers buried in Ladoga
• Here's why Evansville has a Confederate monument

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